Aniakchak Caldera

The Un-Frozen North – A Hotbed for Large Volcanic Activity

Guest post for VolcanoCafé by Greg S (Aka Cbus05) One thing I have come to realize after years of reading about and following volcanoes, is that there is a considerable bias in people’s interest towards certain volcanoes. I used to think there was a western bias, but this phenomenon is just as prevalent in Japan…

Up!

When the ground starts to rise beneath your feet, it is time to sit up. Fishermen would be the first to notice, being unable to leave their harbours due to lack of sea. Governments would discuss the risk of reduction in tax income from fishing, and would commission research. The scientists report evidence of widespread…

Masaya Volcano: the mouth of hell

As most of us are aware, a lava lake appeared on the crater floor inside Santiago Crater on Nicaragua’s Volcan Masaya back in December 2015. This however wasn’t the first time Volcan Masaya hosted an active lava lake, Masaya has had a history of having a lava lake appear and disappear over the centuries and it…

The sad legality of geology

This is an opinion piece about earthquakes, volcanoes and court cases. Last week we learned that a group of relatives to the victims of the 2014 Mount Ontake phreatic detonation that occurred at 11.52 on the 27th of October. Before I start I will say that my heart goes out to the families of the…

Volcan de Colima, Mexico, and Momotombo, Nicuaragua

In the middle of an apparent lull in eye-catching activity elsewhere, our interest has been focused on two Central American volcanoes recently that both bear keeping an eye upon for different reasons. Colima has been active since 2013 and is the most active volcano in Mexico. It is covered by a couple of very good…

Why volcanoes are like humans

When you start to study volcanoes you inevitably start by studying the top of the volcano and you inevitably model your understanding about the volcano in reference to the cone or mountain that you see. Some volcanoes are even referred to as “perfect volcanoes” due to them being almost perfectly symmetrical. But, as we will…

Notre petit nuage magique

In her 1948 novel “Trollkarlens hatt” (Finn Family Moomintroll), Finnish author Tove Jansson describes how on the first day of spring Moomintroll and his friends discover a large, black hat and bring it home without knowing that it is the Magician’s lost hat and that anything that stays in the hat too long will be…

Pēlā paha Mauna Loa

The world of volcanism is not about being equal. There are small volcanoes, there are big volcanoes and then there is Mauna Loa. And until someone actually proves that the Tamu Massif is one single volcano and not a Large Igneous Province or a multiple volcano area I will continue to refer to Mauna Loa…

The Volcanoes of the Galapagos Islands

Guest post for VolcanoCafé by René Goad   First of all I would like to thank Carl Rehnberg for inviting me to write a guest post and I will be talking a bit about the Galapagos Islands. For a good few years I’ve been wanting to visit the Galapagos Islands with the Sierra Negra Volcano…

Medicine Lake Volcano and Lava Beds National Monument

The more you read about volcanism in North America, the more confused you become by the immense complexity of eruptive phenomenae and sequences. As will be clear from my previous article about Mount Tehama (Lassen), it is not always a question about a single central volcano such as Vesuvius or Etna, but about a multitude…