The 1984 eruption of Mauna Loa. This was a sizeable eruption, but far from one of the largest. Photo courtesy of Hawaii Volcano Observatory.

Pēlā paha Mauna Loa

The world of volcanism is not about being equal. There are small volcanoes, there are big volcanoes and then there is Mauna Loa. And until someone actually proves that the Tamu Massif is one single volcano and not a Large Igneous Province or a multiple volcano area I will continue to refer to Mauna Loa…

The image is showing Mid-Jan with Nord-Jan in the background. Nord-Jan is better known as the Beerenberg Volcano. Photograph courtesy of the Norwegian Weather station at Jan Mayen. Please feel free to go to their homepage for more information on Jan Mayen.

Activity at Jan Mayen and the hotspot conundrum

It is intriguing how differently two writers can interpret data. Both Albert and I have written about Jan Mayen, and out of basically the same available data we seem to interpret things quite differently. I expect that Albert and I are going to have quite some fun debating this article in the comment field, please…

The launch of New Horizons on an Atlas V rocket

New Horizons: the way to Pluto

The exploration of space has been a two-way battle. Not between the Russians and Americans, but between humans and robots. The race to the Moon was a victory for the humans. But it is notable that the humans have been in retreat since. We no longer go beyond low-Earth orbit: we could not go back…

Galapagos 9 Rene Goad

The Volcanoes of the Galapagos Islands

Guest post for VolcanoCafé by René Goad   First of all I would like to thank Carl Rehnberg for inviting me to write a guest post and I will be talking a bit about the Galapagos Islands. For a good few years I’ve been wanting to visit the Galapagos Islands with the Sierra Negra Volcano…

View over Katla photographed by Dagur Bragason today. Used by kind permission by the photographer.

Pluto: the big-hearted dwarf + Katla Reawakening

Its career as a planet last for less than half its year. Pluto was discovered late, in 1930, as our final planet, completing the Sun’s brood of nine. (In hindsight it had been seen, but not recognized, as early as 1909.) But it was always an odd one, the runt of the litter, banished to…

Photographer unknown, rights belonging to photographer – A child carrying a baby-lamb, Grimsvötn eruption 2011.

Countdown to Grimsvötn

I have lately read a lot of comments about Iceland being boring and calm. In reality nothing could be more wrong, Iceland is brimming with activity. So, let us take a quick look at some interesting volcanoes before we go to the namesake of this article. Volcanic activity in general If we start in the…

Illuminated lava tube cave. (wikimedia commons)

Medicine Lake Volcano and Lava Beds National Monument

The more you read about volcanism in North America, the more confused you become by the immense complexity of eruptive phenomenae and sequences. As will be clear from my previous article about Mount Tehama (Lassen), it is not always a question about a single central volcano such as Vesuvius or Etna, but about a multitude…

South Sister or Charity from across scenic Green Lake looking west. (glaciers.pdx.edu)

The Volcanoes of the Three Sisters Area, Oregon

This is the third article in our series of re-posts. It is well worth noticing that it was first published well ahead of the volcanic crisis at Volcan Chilles on the border between Equador and Colombia which taught us that even if a volcano is thought to not have erupted for some 174,000 years, it…

The Milky Way over Lake Manzanita with the Chaos Crags, Lassen Peak and Brokeoff Mountain in the background (Wally Pacholka, astropics.org)

Mount Tehama, Brokeoff Mountain and the Lassen Volcanic National Park

This article began as a regular piece on Lassen Peak but quickly expanded as I discovered how incredibly complex the geology and history of the Lassen Volcanic Complex was. Unlike nearby Shasta, Lassen Peak is but a dacite lava dome, one of the largest lava domes on Earth but only one of the dozens of…

“Mount Shastina”. As is clearly visible from this picture, Shastina is a highly impressive volcano in its own right. Notable is that it grew in an incredibly short period of time, 300 years, just under 10,000 years ago. (lakeshastina.org)

The White Mountain, Úytaahkoo or Mount Shasta

Starting today, we begin to reproduce some of the more popular posts originally published on the old site. But don’t worry! We will continue to produce new posts as and when something of interest crops up! Volcanic activity in North America is surprisingly infrequent. In spite of there being no less than 255 volcanoes or…