Nothing Fancy → Ulawun

  Long time no sea. 😀 Actually, I haven’t gone anywhere and I apologize for the sailor joke. What I really mean is that I haven’t done much other than lurk in and around the comments section. My last actual post was a rehash of an ancient topic that I had covered some time ago…

The Moon and the Moonie

This is a revisit due to something Albert spotted out on the Internet; https://phys.org/news/2018-01-great-earthquakes-affected-moon-phases.html   GeoLurking / April 22, 2012 Part I: The Moon Time and time again, someone bops along with the idea that the Moon or the Sun causes an increase in seismicity. They climb up on their soapbox and thump their chest denouncing the…

The Dead Zone

Recently, a minor quake occurred out in the Veiðivötn fissure swarm.   A discussion came about from that and mention was made of something that many of us refer to as “The Dead Zone.”  Why that name?  Well, as many have noted, the area is relatively devoid of quakes when compared to the rest of Iceland. …

Ruminarian V – Get your coffee, you’re gonna need it. (repost)

One of the reasons I do this, is because as I was growing up, having an interest in things Geophysical/Astrophysical, there was always a search for the “wow” factor. Not everyone’s “wow” sense is geared the same… and in some cases, the scale of stuff that people are familiar with has a lot to say…

Ruminarian X Musings on the Cascadia SZ

Who’s there? Those are the first spoken words of Hamlet, or more correctly, “The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark” as written by William Shakespeare.  In modern English, that’s 13 letters, including punctuation.  Under the “infinite monkey theorem” a monkey hitting keys at random on a typewriter keyboard for an infinite amount of time will…

Lake Tanganyika: a celebration of water, fish, and distant volcanoes

17 per cent of the world’s fresh water is found in a single lake. It is the second largest lake in the world (after Baikal), Africa’s deepest lake at 1.5 kilometer, and it has a shoreline almost 2000 km long. Lake Tanganyika is shared by four countries: Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Tanzania…

Jan Mayen: volcano in the freezer

Norway is a country best known for its history, oil, mountains, and an egalitarian attitude to life. Volcanoes are somewhat lacking in this list. But Norway does indeed have one active volcano, given to it by the League of Nations. It is located on the arctic island of Jan Mayen, which became a Norwegian possession,…

A Follow-up on the Scientific Project

Last month, prompted by VC-reader VerboselyLaconic’s observation about the volcanoes of Colombia and Ecuador seemingly exhibiting a trend to suffer flank collapses in a preferred direction, we invited our readers to search worldwide in order to establish whether or not this was a general observation or if it only applied to the volcanoes mentioned by…